Person-Centered Measurement-Based Care (PCMBC)

Project Overview

 

Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) and Persistent Depressive Disorder (PDD) are very common illnesses in Canada and globally.  Research suggests that asking patients to complete questionnaires on their symptoms and sending feedback to their clinicians, called measurement-based care, may improve depression outcomes. Research has also shown that individuals with depression who take an active part in shaping their own treatment, called person-centered care, can also be beneficial.

We would like to study the combination of these two approaches, person-centered measurement-based care, to see if it can significantly improve communication between patients and primary care clinicians and the treatment of depression. Participants will be placed into one of two groups, which will either involve the patient and clinician receiving feedback forms, or not. The patient and clinician feedback forms will be a collection of information about your depressive symptoms, quality of life, and personal goals for recovery.

Eligibility 

This study is recruiting people over the age of 18 living with depression. Interested individuals must have a family doctor or other circle of care clinician that can be involved in their participation (receive feedback to direct care). Participants must have access to a computer and internet connectivity. All potential participants will be individually screened to ensure eligibility.

 

Contact

 

General inquiries: depression@nshealth.ca

Katerina Dikaios, Research Coordinator

katerina.dikaios@nshealth.ca

902 473 5313

Dr. Rudolf Uher, Project Lead

 

Additional Information
 

 

Sponsors

 

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Cognitive Behavioural Therapy and Antidepressants (CBT-ADM)

Project Overview

Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) and Persistent Depressive Disorder (PDD) are very common illnesses that are usually treated with antidepressant medication or psychological therapies such as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT). However, it is often difficult to know which treatment will work best for which patient. Depression can be caused by many things such as changes in the way the body and brain work; it is most likely caused by a combination of several factors.

 

We have discovered several clinical characteristics and blood-tests that predict poor outcome of treatment with antidepressants. It is likely that these same predictors may indicate a higher chance of responding to psychological therapy. This study aims to determine whether depression symptom profile, history of childhood abuse, a blood marker of inflammation, and a genetic test can meaningfully predict who will benefit from antidepressants and who will benefit from psychological therapy.

Eligibility 

This study is recruiting people over the age of 18 that are living with depression and not currently receiving treatment. Individuals interested in participating will be screened to confirm they are eligible and that this study is suitable for them before participation begins.

Contact

 

General inquiries: depression@nshealth.ca

Dr. Rudolf Uher, Project Lead

 

Additional Information
 

 

Sponsors

 

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Optimized Predictive Treatment In Medications for Unipolar Major Depression (OPTIMUM-D)

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Project Overview

Some people with depression respond well to an antidepressant but others require a combination of two medications to feel improvement in their symptoms. The current standard practice is to prescribe an antidepressant first, wait 8 weeks for a response, and then prescribe an additional medication to those who did not respond to the first antidepressant. New findings show that we can predict who is likely to need combined treatment based on patterns of depressive symptoms and brain activity.  

The OPTIMUM-D study will test whether giving combined treatment immediately improves depression treatment outcomes for individuals who are predicted to not respond to an antidepressant alone. A predictive biomarker algorithm will be used to predict treatment outcomes for participants before treatment begins, and therefore select the best treatment course for each individual. 

 

Participants will be randomly divided into two equal groups: Participants in the first group will be given treatment with antidepressant alone or a combined treatment based on predictions from their symptoms and brain activity. Participants in the second group will be given treatment with antidepressant alone or a combined treatment based on chance. After 8 weeks of treatment, we will measure outcomes. At the end of the study, we will answer two questions:  Does combined treatment lead to better outcomes than antidepressants alone? Does choosing treatment based on prediction improve outcomes of depression? If the answer to either question is positive, it could change how depression is treated in clinical practice.  

Eligibility 

This study is recruiting people between the ages of 18 and 60 years old, who have been experiencing depression for at least three months. People that are pregnant or breastfeeding will not be eligible for this project. All interested individuals will be screened to determine their eligibility before their participation can begin.

 

If you are interested in participating in OPTIMUM-D or would like to find out more, please get in touch with the research coordinator at the email below or via the contact form on this website.

 

Contact

 

Dr. Rudolf Uher, Project Lead

Katerina Dikaios, Research Coordinator

katerina.dikaios@nshealth.ca

Additional Information
 

Sponsors